Local Water Source

Local Water Source 2018-06-28T09:53:40+00:00

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APPRECIATE AND CONSERVESCV Family of Water SuppliersCALIFORNIA AQUEDUCTALLUVIUM AND SAUGUS AQUIFERSSCV WaterCASTAIC LAKE

APPRECIATE AND CONSERVE

Water has a long journey to get here, so we must use it wisely.
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SCV Family of Water Suppliers

Two additional local agencies serve SCV residents and businesses.
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CALIFORNIA AQUEDUCT

A 700+ mile aqueduct supplies Southern California water.
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ALLUVIUM AND SAUGUS AQUIFERS

Saugus Aquifer supplies the other half of SCV’s water.
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SCV Water

SCV Water supplies about half of SCV’s water.
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CASTAIC LAKE

SCV’s water flows to Castaic Lake for storage until use.
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where your water comes from

California Aqueduct

In order to supply water to the growing populations of Southern California, engineers needed to develop adequate and reliable systems capable of moving water along the 700+ mile journey from Northern to Southern California. The system, formally known as the State Water Project includes:

  • 33 Dams
  • 34 Storage Facilities, Reservoirs and Lakes
  • 25 Pumping and Hydro-Electric Generation Plants
  • 701 Miles of Aqueducts

Castaic Lake


For the Santa Clarita Valley, the State Water Project water ends its journey in Castaic Lake where it is stored until it is used to provide clean drinking water.

SCV Water


SCV Water is a public water purveyor that provides about half of the water to the Santa Clarita Valley. SCV Water operates three treatment plants, three pump stations, three storage facilities, and more than 45 miles of transmission pipelines.

Alluvium and Saugus Aquifers


The other half or our water is supplied through groundwater sources including shallow alluvial wells and much deeper water sources from the Saugus Aquifer formation.

SCV Family of Water Suppliers


LA County Water Works 36 and the City of Santa Clarita are also members of the Santa Clarita Valley of Water Suppliers and work to promote water conservation and community sustainability.

Appreciate and Conserve

When we turn on our faucets, showers, sprinklers and flush our toilets, wash clothes or dishes, we now know the remarkable journey that each drop of water had to make in order to meet our needs. With this in mind, it is easy to understand why we should highly value and make good use of each and every drop of water.

Lake during sunset

Water pipe going through a desert

Tab filling cup